Definition of Brand

Ask anyone in the world what the definition of BRAND is and you will likely get a different answer everytime. Why is that? Brand is a squishy word with a lot of associations and meanings. It is both an objective and a subject experience that is also quite polarizing. Naturally, I couldn’t resist asking the brilliant minds I interviewed for this book for their definition of the word. As I suspected, I got a lot of interesting answers.

Branding is a profound manifestation of the human condition. It is about belonging: belonging to a tribe, to a religion, to a family. Branding demonstrates that sense of belonging. It has this function for both the people who are part of the same group and also for the people who don’t belong.

Wally Olins

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Branding is a process of meaning manufacture that begins with the biggest, boldest gestures of the corporation and works its way down to the tiniest gestures.

GRANT MCCRACKEN

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A brand is something you have an unexplained, emotional connection to. A brand gives you a sense of familiarity.

PHIL DUNCAN

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Branding is an experience, and advertising is a temptation.

Bruce Duckworth

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A brand is an entity that engenders an emotional connection with a consumer.

Stanley Hainsworth

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A brand is a product with a compelling story—a brand offers “quintessential qualities” for which the consumer believes there is absolutely no substitute. Brands are totems. They tell us stories about our place in culture—about where we are and where we’ve been. They also help us figure out where we’re going.

Cheryl Swanson

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I believe that “brand” is a stand-in, a euphemism, a shortcut for a whole bunch of expectations, worldview connections, experiences, and promises that a product or service makes.

Seth Godin

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A brand is not necessarily visual. It’s a promise of an experience.

Sean Adams

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From the sender’s point of view and from the receiver’s point of view. I don’t want to make it overly complicated, but from the perspective of P&G or Dell or any other company, a brand might be a promise: a promise of what awaits the customer if they buy that particular product, service, or experience. From the receiver’s point of view, I think a brand is a promise.

Dan Pink

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